Actions Taken:

 

Probationary License

A probationary permit may be given if the program has not met the law or rules either on purpose, or an on-going basis, or is hazardous to the health and safety of children. The probationary license, and the notice explaining why it was issued, must be posted in the child care program where it can be easily seen.

Provisional License

The license of a child care program may be placed on provisional status if the program has not met the child care rules either on purpose, or it has happened more than once, or it is dangerous to the health and safety of children. A provisional license is given so that the program has time to fix the problems. The provisional license, and the notice explaining why it was issued, must be posted in the child care program where it can be easily seen.

Special Provisional License

A special provisional permit may be given to any type of program when child maltreatment occurred in the child care arrangement. The program may not be allowed to enroll new children during the time the special provisional permit is in effect unless they receive written permission. Both the special provisional license and the notice stating why it was issued must be posted.

Administrative Action:

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Date the Notice of Administrative Action was sent

Notification to the program which details the type of Administrative Action taken and any corrective actions the program is required to comply with.

Fine

Also known as a civil penalty, a fine may be given to a child care provider if the nature of a problem is a serious violation of a child care regulation.

Notice of Action

Programs that have serious or repeated violations may receive an Administrative Action issued by the Division of Child Development and Early Education. Providers have the right to appeal an administrative action. When a provider appeals an action, a contested case hearing before an Administrative Law Judge is scheduled. The hearing is an opportunity for the provider and the Division of Child Development and Early Education to have witnesses testify about the situation which resulted in the administrative action. The provider/operator has 30 days after receiving the Notice of Administrative Action to file an appeal.

Written Reprimand

Child care programs receive notices for not meeting child care rules. This is the least severe penalty issued by the Division of Child Development and Early Education. It is issued for a problem that is not likely to happen again. For example, a program may receive a written reprimand because there was a change in ownership of the program and the Division of Child Development and Early Education was not notified. A written reprimand does not have to be posted in the child care program.

Written Warning

Child care programs receive notices for not meeting child care rules. This warning is a more serious notice than a written reprimand. It is given to notify a provider that a problem has been documented. The written warning includes the changes that must be made to correct the problem. For example, a program may have had more children per caregiver than is allowed by the rules. A written warning does not have to be posted in the child care program.

Allocation Formula:

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A formula established by the North Carolina General Assembly for distributing state and federal funds for child care funds to all counties. The formula has three factors: (a) the county's population; (b) the number of children in poverty under age 6 in the county; and (c) the number of working mothers with children under the age of 6 in the county.

Certification/Accreditation:

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Disclaimer

The Division of Child Development has attempted to compile a complete list of all state or national certification/accreditation organizations. Every attempt has been made to make sure information given on this page is accurate. Since inaccuracies may occur, this page does not replace official sources. All information is presented without warranties and does not constitute an endorsement of any program, or products, either expressed or implied. If you find some questionable information or are aware of other certification or accreditation organizations, please E-Mail the Webmaster-->.

National Association for Family
Child Care
(NAFCC)

The NAFCC works with family child care home operators to provide quality child care. Safety, health, nutrition, adult and child contact, learning, outdoor area, and professionalism are all a part of being accredited.

National Association for the Education of
Young Children
(NAEYC)

NAEYC programs meet higher voluntary standards for young children and their families. Emphasis is placed on how the staff talk and work with children. Health and safety, number of staff members to the number of children, staff education, play and learning spaces, and program plans are all a part of being accredited.

National Early Childhood Program Accreditation (NECPA)

Licensed child care or preschool programs in operation at least one year must meet standards in the areas of staff qualifications and education, administration, developmental program, health and safety, parent and community involvement, and the indoor and outdoor environments. Both parents and staff are surveyed as part of the process.

National Afterschool Association

The NAA system is designed for programs serving five to fourteen-year-olds. Programs must meet quality standards that describe the quality of relationships, environments, activities, health and safety practices, and program administration.

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools accredits educational institutions ranging from early childhood centers to universities. The primary focus of the Association is improving educational quality. Continued membership with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools is based on improvements demonstrated through annual reports, interim reviews and periodic evaluations.

DCDEE Staff

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 Child Care Consultant

DCDEE employs child care consultants to ensure child care regulations are being met.  Child care consultants make annual monitoring visits to programs.   

Investigations Consultant

DCDEE employs investigations consultants to conduct investigations of child maltreatment in child care facilities, to ensure child care regulations are being met. 

Child Care Resource and Referral (CCR&R):

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CCR&R agencies work with parents, child care providers, and local planners to help make child care better, affordable, and more available. Parents can call a child care resource and referral agency to get up-to-date child care information and help in choosing quality child care. CCR&R agencies work to increase the number of child care spaces. They also provide training and information to existing and new child care providers.

Criminal Background Check:

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A search of local, state, and federal records to determine if a person is a qualified child care provider.  Anyone working, or wanting to work, in child care must complete a criminal background check prior to employment. The results of the background check are used to decide if the person is fit to care for children.

DCDEE:

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Division of Child Development and Early Education

 

 

 

 

Eligibility Requirements:

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The requirements a family must meet to receive financial assistance to pay for child care. The criteria is based upon both the family need and family income. Reasons for needing child care may include: the parent is working or looking for work or attending a job training program; the child has developmental needs; or as a support to Child Protective or Child Welfare Services. Depending upon the reason for care, some families may be able to receive financial assistance without considering how much they earn. (Also see Subsidized Child Care Assistance Program.

Facility Identification Number (ID#):

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License Number

Every home and center has an ID number that is assigned by the Division of Child Development and Early Education. The ID # is listed on the permit (license). If you have a question about a program, or want to receive information about a program, it is very helpful to have the ID # available when you call or write to the Division of Child Development and Early Education.

General Information:

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Child Care Facility

Includes child care centers and family child care homes, and any other child care arrangement not excluded by N.C.G.S. 110-86(2) that provides child care. 

Developmentally Appropriate

A term that means suitable to the chronological age range and developmental characteristics of a specific age group of children.

Drop-in-Care

A child care arrangement where care is provided while parents participate in activities that are not employment related and where the parents are on the premises or otherwise easily accessible, such as drop-in care provided in health spas, shopping malls, churches, or resort hotels. 

Owner

Any person with a five percent or greater equity interest in a child care facility. 

Operator

Includes the owner, director or other person having primary responsibility for operation of a child care facility. 

Permit Information:

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Approved Capacity

Maximum number of children allowed to be in care during any shift.

Compliance History

Compliance history is a minimum requirement for maintaining any license as well as a Notice of Compliance.. Any center or family child care home must maintain a compliance history of at least 75% over the previous 18 months or during the length of time the facility has operated.

Educational Standards

Education Standards indicates the level of education of the director and teachers. This is one of the components used to determine a facility's star license rating and has a maximum point value of seven points.

Family Child Care Home License (FCCH)

A FCCH License is given to child care homes who meet minimum requirements for the legal operation of a family child care home. The FCCH License must be posted in the home where it can be easily seen.

Notice of Compliance

The law allows religious-sponsored centers and religious-sponsored homes to choose to operate without obtaining a permit. They get a Notice of Compliance instead of a permit. These facilities and homes must meet minimum health and safety rules. They do not have to meet certain rules about staff qualifications, yearly training hours, and rules related to activities for the children. Notices of Compliance are printed on Division of Child Development and Early Education letterhead stationery. Posting of the Notice of Compliance is not required.

Probationary License

A probationary permit may be given if the program has not met the law or rules either on purpose, or an on-going basis, or is hazardous to the health and safety of children. The probationary license, and the notice explaining why it was issued, must be posted in the child care program where it can be easily seen.

Program Standards

Program Standards indicates the quality of care a child receives. This is one of the components used to determine a facility's star license rating and has a maximum point value of seven points.

Provisional License

The license of a child care program may be placed on provisional status if the program has not met the child care rules either on purpose, or it has happened more than once, or it is dangerous to the health and safety of children. A provisional license is given so that the program has time to fix the problems. The provisional license, and the notice explaining why it was issued, must be posted in the child care program where it can be easily seen.

Quality Point

Child care facilities may choose to meet additional criteria to earn one quality point which will be added to the total points earned in program standards and staff education to determine the total number of stars earned.

NC Pre-K Program

The North Carolina Pre-Kindergarten (NC Pre-K) program is intended to provide high quality educational experiences to enhance school readiness for at-risk four-year-olds in North Carolina for success in kindergarten

 

 

Star Rated License

A star rated license is issued based on the evaluation of program standards and staff education.  Child Care facilities with a one star license meet minimum licensing standards. Facilities with a two to five star license voluntarily meet a higher level of enhanced standards.

Religious-sponsored Program

Any child care center, home, or summer day camp run by a church, synagogue, or school of religious charter. Religious-sponsored programs do not have to meet certain rules about staff qualifications or other rules about training hours or activities. Programs may choose to have a Notice of Compliance that shows that the center or home meets minimum standards such as health, fire and safety rules.

Restrictions on License

Restrictions on a license show specific limits a program has.

Revocation of Permit

A child care program's permit may be taken away if Division of Child Development decides that the program has not met the rules or law on purpose, on an on-going basis, or the program is dangerous to the health or safety and/or the program has not made efforts to fix the problem. The child care provider is told in advance of the decision, and is given the chance to ask for a hearing about the decision, before the permit is taken away. If the child care provider does not ask for a hearing about the decision, the program must close. If there is a hearing, the provider may continue to operate until the process is complete. The notice that the permit has been taken away must be posted in the child care program where it can be easily seen.

Special Provisional License

A special provisional permit may be given to any type of program when abuse or neglect occurred in the child care arrangement. The program may not be allowed to enroll new children during the time the special provisional permit is in effect unless they receive written permission.  Both the special provisional license and the notice stating why it was given must be posted.

Staff/Child Ratio Policy

A Child Care Program may choose to set staff/child ratio lower than the ratios mandated by state regulations.

Star Rating

Child Care Programs may obtain a 1-5 Star Rated License. Programs with a 1 star license meet minimum standards. Programs with a 2-5 star license voluntarily meet a higher level of enhanced standards.

Suspension of Permit

A child care program's permit may be suspended for up to 45 days if the Division of Child Development and Early Education decides that the program is not meeting rules on purpose, on an on-going basis, or dangerous to the health or safety of children and/or the program has not made reasonable efforts to correct the problem. When the permit is suspended, the program must close. Notice of a suspended permit must be posted in the program where it can be easily seen.

Temporary License

A temporary license is given to a new center or to a previously licensed center when there is a change in ownership or location, for a period of six months. This allows the center to achieve a satisfactory rating for a regular license. A temporary license must be posted in the center where it can be easily seen.

Total Points

This number reflects the sum of the three point categories of the star rating system: Program Standards, Educational Standards and Quality Point. The total possible point value is 15.

Professional Development:

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Lead teacher

An individual who is responsible for planning and implementing the daily program of activities for a group of children in a child care center and who is scheduled to be in that classroom for at least two-thirds of the total daily hours of operation. There must be at least one lead teacher assigned to each group of children.

Accredited

Nationally recognized higher education regional certification (for higher education institutions outside of the United States, the recognized system of the specified country's accreditation process will be accepted).

Environment Rating Scales:

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Early Childhood Environmental Rating Scale

(Harms, Cryer, and Clifford, 1998, published by Teacher College Press, New York, NY) - The instrument used to evaluate quality of care received by a group of children in a child care center, when the majority of children in the group are two and a half year through five years old to achieve three through seven points for the program standards of a rated license.

Environment Rating Scale

A tool that is used by an assessor to measure how well caregivers respond to and provide care for children. The Environment Rating Scale (ERS) also assesses health and safety practices. The quality and quantity of play and learning activities are also assessed.

Family Child Care  Rating Scale

(Harms and Clifford, 1989, published by Teachers College Press, New York, NY) - The instrument used to evaluate the quality of care received by children in family child care homes to achieve three through seven points for the program standards of a rated license.

Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale

(Harms, Cryer, and Clifford, 1990, published by Teacher College Press, New York, NY) - The instrument used to evaluate the quality of care received by a group of children in a child care center, when the majority of children in the group are younger than thirty months old, to achieve three through seven points for program standards of a rated license.

Sanitation:

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Sanitation Inspection

An inspection that is made by the local health department to determine whether a child care center meets the minimum sanitation rules adopted by the North Carolina Commission for Health Services. These rules look at cleanliness of the facility; toilet, diaper change and handwashing areas; food preparation and service; sanitizing of eating and drinking utensils; sleeping areas; water supply; infectious disease control; sewage disposal; ventilation; and other areas related to public health.

Sanitation Rating

The sanitation rating is determined by the number of penalty points a child care center receives during the health department's inspection. The rating must be posted for public view. More serious violations are recorded as 6-point demerits.

The following scale shows what the different sanitation ratings mean.
Superior -- 0-15 demerits, no 6-point item
Approved -- 15-30 demerits, no 6-point item
Provisional-- 31-45 demerits, or a 6-point item
Disapproved-- 46 or more demerits, or failure to improve provisional classification
Summary Disapproval-- when right-of-entry to inspect is denied, when an inspection is discontinued at the request of the operator, or when a water sample is confirmed positive for fecal coliform, total coliform or other chemical constituents.

Age groups:

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Preschooler or Preschool-Age Child

Any child that does not fit the definition of school-age child.

School-age Child

School-age child means any child who is attending or who has attended a public or private grade school or kindergarten and meets age requirements as specified in G.S. 115C-364. 

Smart Start:

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Smart Start is a statewide initiative to help all North Carolina children enter school healthy and ready to succeed. Smart Start may help with the cost of child care. It may help child care homes or centers improve their programs. Smart Start also helps family’s access health care and other services that are very important during a child's early years.

Enrolled in Subsidized Child Care Assistance Program (SCC):

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The program that provides funding to help parents with the cost of enrollment in regulated child care programs. (Also see Eligibility Requirements).

Enrolled in Subsidized Child Care Assistance Program (SCC):

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Approval for Subsidized Child Care Assistance

You may be eligible to receive financial assistance which can help pay the cost of child care. For more information about Subsidized Child Care Assistance Program contact your local Department of Social Services or Child Care Resource and Referral Agency.

Child Care Voucher

Document issued to the family that is determined eligible to receive child care services by the Local Purchasing Agency (LPA). This voucher serves as an agreement between the parent and the provider and is the mechanism which places the responsibility for the selection of a provider with the parent instead of the LPA. The voucher also certifies that payment could be made to an eligible provider participating in the Subsidized Child Care Assistance Program.

Subsidized School-age Child:

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Any child currently enrolled in public or private grade school that is receiving child care assistance from the local Department of Social Service.

 

 

 

 

Type of Program:

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Center

An arrangement where, at any one time, there are three or more preschool-age children or nine or more school-age children receiving child care.   Capacity is determined by the available square footage and building, fire and safety standards.

Family Child Care Home (FCCH)

A child care arrangement located in a residence where, at any one time, more than two children, but less than nine children, receive child care. 

Summer Day Camp

A seasonal recreational program that provides child care and operates for less than 4 months per year. These programs are not required to be licensed unless they participate in the subsidized child care program.

Visits-Announced:

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Annual Compliance with Rated License Assessment

Visit made to monitor for compliance with all minimum child care requirements and applicable enhanced requirements for a Rated License Assessment. (Completed if an annual compliance visit has not been conducted within the last 6 months.)

Courtesy

Visit made primarily to stop by a child care facility or to meet with the operator upon request when no monitoring occurs; for example, to pick up paperwork, etc.

Prelicensing Consultation

Visit made to provide technical assistance and consultation regarding child care requirements to potential child care operators.

Technical Assistance/Training  

Visit to provide technical assistance to providers regarding child care requirements. May be done at the request of the operator and/or as the need arises.

ERS (Environment Rating Scale)

Visit made to review the results of Environment Rating Scale Assessment(s). 

Letter of Intent

An announced or unannounced visit to monitor for child care requirements applicable to a religiously sponsored child care program after a Letter of Intent has been received by DCDEE but prior to a Notice of Compliance being issued.

Rated License Assessment

Visit made to monitor for child care requirements applicable to a religiously sponsored child care program after a Letter of Intent has been received by DCDEE but prior to a Notice of Compliance being issued

Visits-Unannounced:

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Complaint Investigation

Visit made to investigate a complaint report alleging child maltreatment and/or violations of child care requirements

Compliant Follow-up

Visit made to continue the investigation of a complaint investigation and/or to monitor for correction of violations of child care requirements cited during a Complaint Visit.

Annual Compliance

Visit made to a facility within a twelve month time period by a child care consultant to monitor for compliance with all applicable child care requirements. 

Annual Compliance Follow-up Visit

Visit made to follow-up on violations cited during the Annual Compliance Visit. 

 

 

Routine Unannounced

Visit made to monitor for compliance with child care requirements between annual compliance visits or when an annual compliance visit has already been conducted in the past 12 months

Temporary Time Period

Visit made to monitor for compliance with child care requirements and provide technical assistance as needed during the temporary time period

Administrative Action Follow-Up Lic

Visit made to monitor for compliance with a Corrective Action Plan issued as part of an Administrative Action (Issued due to licensing concerns only)

Administrative Action Follow-Up A/N

Visit made to monitor for compliance with a Corrective Action Plan issued as part of an Administrative Action (issued due to child maltreatment concerns only)

Attempted

This type of visit category is used when a consultant attempts to conduct any type of visit and does not find the facility in operation and no monitoring occurs.

Other

Depends on situation; to follow-up on CRC Disqualifications, conduct NC Pre-K monitoring, or other visits that do not fit in to another category

 

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